HSA shares Hispanic culture

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HSA shares Hispanic culture

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The Hispanic Student Association made tribute to Hispanic tradition by hosting a three day event, Hispanic Heritage Week. These events were designed to inform and educate students about the Hispanic culture.
“This is the first time we do this,” Maria Mendoza Junior Bilingual ec-6th major, said. “We plan on doing this every year and hopes it gets bigger and bigger every year.”
HSA is a non-profit organization that spreads awareness about the Hispanic culture to the community. Their organization is based on community service which includes a specific project  called One Toy, One Dream where they collect toys and donate them to kids in Chihuahua, México.
“It is important for people to learn more about the beauty of other cultures, “Juan Gallardo Advisor for the Hispanic Student Association, said. “This teaches us to appreciate others to be more understanding of their background.”
Hispanic Heritage Week included music and poetry along with learning about the history of the Spanish language on  Oct. 14. On Oct. 15, WT alumn spoke to people about their road to success, and on Oct. 16 the HSA hosted their keynote speaker, Carlos Ojeda Jr. Ojeda Jr. is a first generation student and was the first person in his family to graduate with honors and go to college. Carlos earned his bachelor’s degree in business management at the University of Bloomsburg and his Master’s in Business Administrations from Kutztown University. Now Ojeda Jr. is known for sharing his message to many organizations.
“Never, ever, ever let anyone tell you who you are or what you will become. That’s your destiny to fulfill, no one else’s.”
Ojeda Jr.was one of the many speakers at the events. Many were alumni who graduated from WT.
“I came to the United States of America to learn English and achieve the American Dream,” Paola Duarte Albarran part time speech instructor from West Texas A&M University , said. “ I would never imagine my life was going to change like it has right now.”
Duarte left her home in Bogota, Colombia to study in America and learn English. She came to the U.S. with two suitcases and left everything else behind; her family, job, apartment, and her dog. Now she is the main anchor for Telemundo Amarillo, the first Hispanic news station in the panhandle.

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