Nonprofit rescues Shiba Inu dogs

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Nonprofit rescues Shiba Inu dogs

Dan Rather is a 7-year-old Shiba who is very curious.

Dan Rather is a 7-year-old Shiba who is very curious.

Dan Rather is a 7-year-old Shiba who is very curious.

Dan Rather is a 7-year-old Shiba who is very curious.

Bethney Mosteller, Reporter

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The Shiba Inu Rescue of Texas is a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit organization that finds homes for abandoned, stray or unwanted dogs of the Shiba Inu breed. They also take them out of pounds and puppy mills.

Kim Douglass has been a volunteer foster parent for the rescue for the past fourteen years. She has fostered and helped find forever homes for eighteen dogs.

“We started working with another group called Canine Mill Rescue,” Douglass said. “They go to puppy mills and convince the owners to give them the unwanted dogs.”

The Shiba Inu is a small Japanese breed of dog. They are very active dogs and were originally bred for hunting.

“A Shiba Inu is kind of like a cross between a three year old child and a cat,” Douglass said. “They are very ornery but also very sweet and adorable. Once you get to know them they are great pets.”

Kendra Dukatnik, a Theater major at WT, is familiar with the breed.

“I have heard of Shiba Inus and I really like them,” Dukatnik said. “I would like to help and volunteer with them if I had more time.”

The rescue was started in 1999 and has found homes for hundreds of shibas. The rescue is made up of different foster homes around the state. They cannot take in any owner surrenders because they are not a shelter. They only take in dogs that are at high risk for being euthanized.

“Normally we only foster two dozen dogs each year throughout the network of homes,” Kim Douglass said. “There have been 35 to 40 dogs this year and it’s only October.”

Each dog that is placed in foster care is evaluated for temperament. They are also brought up to date on their shots, spayed or neutered and given physical exams before they are adopted.

The rescue group has an Amazon account where people can donate items to the volunteer foster parents.

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